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Les opportunités pour atteindre les femmes qui ont un besoin non satisfait de planification familiale à Madagascar

Les opportunités pour atteindre les femmes qui ont un besoin non satisfait de planification familiale à MadagascarTenant compte du fait que un tiers de la demande globale de planification familiale reste non satisfait, il est important d’explorer d’autres opportunités pour atteindre les femmes dont la demande n’est pas satisfaite. Le présent rapport analyse les données de l’étude 2012-2013 des Objectifs Millénaires pour le Développement afin d’identifier de telles opportunités par le biais de la panoplie des services de santé dont ces femmes bénéficient.

M-Health Referral System Designed to Strengthen Access to GBV Services in Botswana

Phemelo Maiketso, Gender Affairs Department Research Director, stands in front of Women Against Rape, an NGO in Maun, Botswana. Photo by Shelah S. Bloom.

Guest post by MEASURE Evaluation’s Shelah S. Bloom, Senior Technical Advisor for Gender, and Jen Curran, M&E Technical Specialist

One out of three women in Botswana reported experiencing intimate partner violence in 2013. To address the care and support needs of gender-based violence survivors, MEASURE Evaluation worked with the Gender Affairs Department (GeAD) in Botswana’s Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs to formalize a referral system for access to comprehensive care.

Stakeholder engagement meetings were held to research the existing referral system and relationships between organizations that provide services. The meetings also assessed the need for capacity building on gender-based violence (GBV) as well as referral systems and monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of GBV services. Based on information gathered from stakeholders at the local and national levels, a mobile-based information system was developed to connect providers who serve GBV survivors and to monitor and evaluate the referral system using mobile phones and a web-based application. An 18-month pilot of the referral system will begin in early 2015.

Results of a participatory exercise to show where GBV clients are currently referred between service providers in Mochudi, Botswana.

Results of a participatory exercise to show where GBV clients are currently referred between service providers in Mochudi, Botswana. Photo by Shelah S. Bloom.

“The average client needs four or five services,” says Jen Curran. “Designing a mobile-based solution ensures that information is shared and that the extra work for the service providers is limited.”

Survivors might want to access services by going to the traditional justice system (“the Kgotla”), a clinic, the police, or an NGO. “Where she enters the systems is her choice,” says Shelah Bloom. “The new referral system is designed to ensure better follow-up and coordination among these services once she accesses one of the service providers.”

The referral system is designed to produce high-quality data, as data entry takes place via pop-up menus and pre-populated fields for client and service identification. The system produces regular reports on standard, agreed-on indicators made available to stakeholders at the national and community levels, as well as to providers at individual service delivery points. It was designed with expansion in mind, including eventual scale-up of the system nationally.

MEASURE Evaluation will also use the system to pilot a national-level data system for all programming related to the prevention of and response to GBV in Botswana. An integrated system will help reduce GBV, as well as related outcomes such as HIV, and could serve as a model for national GBV systems in other countries or regions.

For more information

MEASURE Evaluation, a five-year global project funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID), works to improve health information systems, tools, and approaches. The pilot of this m-health approach in Botswana will generate evidence on how best to build an integrated referral system for survivors of GBV and the capacity of institutions to use it. For more information on the project’s related work on GBV, see The Women’s Justice and Empowerment Initiative: Lessons Learned and Implications for Gender-Based Violence Programming in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Gender-Based Violence and Women’s Economic Empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa

Perspectives on Gender-Based Violence and Women’s Economic Empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa: Challenges and OpportunitiesPerspectives on Gender-Based Violence and Women’s Economic Empowerment in Sub-Saharan Africa: Challenges and Opportunities

Economic empowerment has long been considered a key component in structural interventions to reduce gender inequality and the experience of gender-based violence (GBV) among women and girls. However, results from recent studies have yielded inconsistent evidence on the relationship between women’s economic empowerment (WEE) interventions and the risk of GBV. For example, there is evidence to support the theory that WEE increases risk of GBV, possibly because increased empowerment challenges the status quo in the household, which can result in a male partner using violence to maintain his position. Alternatively, there is evidence indicating increased empowerment reduces GBV because educational or financial empowerment offers higher status in the household, which then decreases women’s risk of experiencing violence.

This study includes a systematic review of the literature as well as key informant interviews (KIIs) with program staff and experts from organizations implementing and/or conducting research on economic empowerment interventions targeted to women in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings from the literature review guided the questions for the KIIs. The KIIs added to the findings from the systematic review by focusing on what programs identify as important drivers in the relationship between WEE and GBV and the common M&E practices programs use to document intervention effect on gender outcomes.

MEASURE Evaluation’s Dr. Jason Smith Presents at the South African Office of the Presidency

Dr. Jason Smith at the South African Office of the Presidency for a presentation.

Dr. Jason Smith at the Office of the Presidency to present.

South Africa’s Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, in collaboration with MEASURE Evaluation Strategic Information for South Africa, invited Dr. Jason Smith, Deputy Director for MEASURE Evaluation, to the Presidency of South Africa as part of its M&E Learning Network workshop series.

During the September session, Dr. Smith shared experiences and lessons learned on evaluating impact from MEASURE Evaluation Phase III implementation. Main areas of discussion involved the use of evidence for improved performance and governance in the public sector, including data demand and use, knowledge management, and capacity building and training.

Devex Interviews Leopoldo Villegas on Future of the Fight Against Malaria


MEASURE Evaluation’s Leopoldo Villegas talked about the future of the fight against malaria in an interview with Devex President and Editor-in-Chief Raj Kumar. Read more about the interview and learn about Devex’s Healthy Means campaign.

Strengthening M&E Systems for Avian & Pandemic Influenza Programs in Southeast Asia

Measuring Progress and Progress in Measuring: Strengthening M&E Systems for Avian and Pandemic Influenza Programs in Southeast Asia, 2006-2014Measuring Progress and Progress in Measuring: Strengthening M&E Systems for Avian and Pandemic Influenza Programs in Southeast Asia, 2006-2014

This end-of-activity report summarizes MEASURE Evaluation’s work in strengthening monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems for avian and pandemic influenza programs in Southeast Asia.

Between 2006 and 2014, MEASURE Evaluation supported the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Regional Development Mission in Asia in its efforts to develop regional M&E standards, support the establishment of country-level M&E systems, build capacity for avian and pandemic influenza M&E at provincial and district levels, and generated lessons learned to inform similar efforts in other regions.

Outils d’enquête sur le bien-être de l’enfant, de la personne qui s’occupe de l’enfant et du ménage pour les programmes destinés aux orphelins et enfants vulnérables: Un manuel

Outils d'enquête sur le bien-être de l'enfant, de la personne qui s'occupe de l'enfant et du ménage pour les programmes destinés aux orphelins et enfants vulnérables. Un manuelCes outils de collecte de données sont des questionnaires destinés à une enquête auprès de ménages avec des enfants âgés 0 à 17 ans et les adultes du ménage qui s’occupent des enfants. Les questionnaires sont conçues pour mesurer des changements dans le bien-être des enfants, des personnes qui s’occupent des enfants et des ménages qui peuvent être attribués, dans la mesure du raisonnable, aux interventions du programme. Les outils sont accompagnés par:

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