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Strengthening Data Quality for Better Health Policies, Programs, and Services in Tanzania

Strengthening Data Quality for Better Health Policies, Programs, and Services in TanzaniaSince 2008, MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania (MEval-TZ) has conducted annual data quality assessments (DQAs) and provided monitoring and evaluation (M&E) capacity building through customized trainings and mentoring among more than 40 implementing partners (IPs). These groups worked in HIV prevention, care, and treatment; most vulnerable children; home-based care; and HIV testing and counseling programs. Through DQAs, the project assessed strengths and weaknesses in data collection, compilation, and reporting from health facilities to the district, regional, and national levels; strengthened M&E systems and the quality of data reported; and built M&E sustainability by strengthening the capacity of IP M&E staff, members of regional and council health management teams, and health facility staff to conduct routine DQAs without reliance on external support. This brief shares more.

Sustainability Planning, Implementation, and Transition: A Case Study from the MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania Associate Award

Sustainability Planning, Implementation, and Transition: A Case Study from the MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania Associate AwardThe MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania Associate Award (MEval-TZ) operated from 2015 to 2019 with funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), and the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI). Its ambitious goal was to sustainably improve integration and effectiveness of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems to strengthen Tanzania’s health information systems (HIS). To achieve this goal, the project implemented activities categorized under three intermediate result areas covering both the Tanzania mainland and Zanzibar at several levels of the health system and with different HIS.

To support these goals, the project had a diverse set of activities, ranging from improving national M&E systems to developing a strong network of M&E professionals. The project pursued two crosscutting activities: gender integration and sustainability and collaboration. These aimed to ensure that all project activities benefitted from male and female participation and that they were sustainable.

MEval–TZ promoted local capacity building and sustainability as core features of its approach. This brief focuses on the project’s sustainability planning, implementation, and transition.

Experiences and Perceptions of Health Staff on Applying Information Technology for Health Data Management in Ghana

Experiences and Perceptions of Health Staff on Applying Information Technology for Health Data Management in GhanaUser perspectives and experiences are pertinent to the continued use of mobile technologies for health data collection and management. What users experience affects not only what can be accomplished, but also what attracts them to the mobile technology; and what attracts them to the mobile technology affects how willing they are to understand and continue using it. Since 2011, Ghana Health Service—in response to the expanding health information needs for the effective and efficient management of family planning and reproductive and child health service delivery at the district level—has implemented two forms of mobile technology to facilitate health data collection and management in four districts of the Central Region of Ghana. These mobile technologies have been praised for reducing costs and the physical effort required of health staff. The main study objective was to explore and document the experiences and perspectives of health staff and managers in the four districts on use of mobile technology to collect and manage health data in district health systems.

Access the resource.

DHIS 2 Functions and Data Use for Health Information System Strengthening: Development and Application of a Practical Training Package

DHIS 2 Functions and Data Use for Health Information System Strengthening: Development and Application of a Practical Training PackageA national health information system (HIS) is the backbone of efforts to gather data to understand a country’s health issues. MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania (MEval-TZ) has worked with the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children (MOHCDGEC) since 2014 to strengthen the performance and management of the country’s HIS.

MEval-TZ’s overarching goal has been to improve the systems that monitor and evaluate health and social service programs while enhancing local capacity to sustain and use these systems. Since the beginning of the project, MEval-TZ has supported the health management information system (HMIS) unit of the MOHCDGEC to institutionalize the DHIS 2 software for HMIS through training and capacity building at the national, regional, and district levels and by developing and implementing tools and resources to enhance system use. This document is a snapshot of the project’s work to help the ministry develop a training package for DHIS 2 functions and data use for HIS strengthening. The package is a standard, practical training resource for building the skills and competence of health system staff to employ DHIS 2 to analyze and use system data to improve evidence informed decision making at local and national levels.

PLACE Assessments in Uganda

CoversIn sub-Saharan Africa, Uganda has a long history of successful HIV prevention that has decreased HIV prevalence from between 20 percent to 30 percent to now under six percent. However, to enhance efforts to reach prevention and treatment targets, the country sought to augment national-level data with district-level data so that tailored, localized responses and strategic use of resources could be developed. Uganda conducted a new round of the Priorities for Local AIDS Control Efforts (PLACE) in 25 districts in Uganda to collect that data. Now, district-level data provides reliable evidence to better understand where to reach those most likely to acquire and transmit HIV.

Access an overview of the reports here or individual district briefs here.

Documenting Health Data Quality Practices in Tanzania

Documenting Health Data Quality Practices in TanzaniaSince 2008, MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania (MEval-TZ) has been conducting annual data quality assessments (DQAs) within selected HIV testing, care, and treatment programs. The DQAs aim to identify strengths and weaknesses in data collection, aggregation, and reporting at all levels, from health facilities to intermediate reporting levels of implementing partners (IPs) to the national headquarters of those partners and ultimately to USAID. The assessments also aim to improve the capacity of IPs and health facilities to collect and report good-quality data and to carry out internal DQAs. After each round of DQAs, MEval-TZ supported IPs and health facilities to develop action plans to address gaps that have been identified in their health information systems (HIS).

MEval-TZ conducted this study to describe key facilitators of and barriers to the effectiveness of DQAs in strengthening data quality, to understand the contribution of the DQAs in strengthening HIS, to assess the effects of MEval-TZ’s monitoring and evaluation (M&E) system strengthening activities at the subnational level, and to identify successes and opportunities for improving data quality interventions.

Data for Impact: The D4I Approach for Strong Health Data

Data for Impact: The D4I Approach for Strong Health DataData for Impact (D4I) is a five-year cooperative agreement funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) that supports countries to mobilize the power of data as actionable evidence that can improve programs, policies, and—ultimately—health outcomes. D4I seeks to achieve the following results:

  • Build strong evidence needed for program and policy decision making through expanded use of existing data sources and with new data generated through innovative research designs and data collection strategies
  • Strengthen individual and organizational capacity to develop evidence for health decision making and to receive direct funding from USAID
  • Facilitate data use to improve global health programs and policies through compelling data visualization and communication strategies.

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