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Quick Country Start-Up Package for Malaria Surveillance, Monitoring, and Evaluation Training

Quick Country Start-Up Package for Malaria Surveillance, Monitoring, and Evaluation TrainingSince 2010, MEASURE Evaluation has offered a suite of trainings to contribute to the strengthening of country-level malaria surveillance, monitoring, and evaluation (SME) systems. These trainings are supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S. President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) and endorsed by the Roll Back Malaria Monitoring and Evaluation Reference Group (RMB MERG). Activities include annual regional malaria SME workshops in English and French, customized country-specific malaria SME workshops, and online malaria SME courses in English and French.

After 10 years of implementation, there is a need for MEASURE Evaluation to document the process based on lessons learned and provide countries with a reference document for implementing these trainings. Furthermore, as the project comes to a close, the reference document will serve as a quick startup guide for future country malaria SME workshop implementation, including step-by-step approaches, practical tools, and trouble shooting.

Coverage of Malaria Interventions in Nigeria: Secondary Analysis of Data from National Surveys

Coverage of Malaria Interventions in Nigeria: Secondary Analysis of Data from National SurveysMalaria is a major public health burden in Nigeria, posing a risk to the entire population. In 2014, the country reported more than 7.8 million confirmed cases of malaria and more than 6,000 malaria deaths. Malaria accounts for approximately 60 percent of outpatient visits and 30 percent of hospitalizations among children under five. Over the past decade, substantial efforts have been made in malaria control by the government and its partners to expand coverage of insecticide-treated nets, conduct intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy, and improve and scale up malaria case management.

To further its efforts to reduce the malaria burden, the National Malaria Elimination Programme (NMEP) and its partners are working to scale up malaria interventions in line with the Nigeria’s National Malaria Strategic Plan 2014–2020.

To measure progress of malaria control achievements in the past decade in Nigeria and to guide future investments, Nigeria has implemented several population-based surveys, including the Nigeria Malaria Indicator Survey in 2010 and 2015, and the Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey in 2008 and 2013.

In response to a request from the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), MEASURE Evaluation, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development, conducted this research study to provide further evidence to guide both PMI’s and NMEP’s efforts in malaria program implementation in Nigeria.

MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania’s Technical Assistance for Malaria Surveillance in Mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar: Progress 2016–2018

MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania’s Technical Assistance for Malaria Surveillance in Mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar: Progress 2016–2018The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) funds the MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania (MEval-TZ) project, which counts among its work the provision of technical assistance for malaria surveillance in both Mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar. Malaria is considered a major public health problem in both Mainland and Zanzibar. According to the United States President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI), all residents are at risk. Malaria prevalence is lower in Zanzibar (<1 percent); on the mainland, more than 26 percent of all outpatient clinic visits are attributable to malaria, resulting in an estimated 7.7 million confirmed cases annually.

This brief provides an overview of the work and progress.

Third Kenya National Malaria Forum: Malaria Control in Devolved Kenya: Optimising Efforts Towards Elimination

Third Kenya National Malaria Forum: Malaria Control in Devolved Kenya: Optimising Efforts Towards EliminationThe third Kenya National Malaria Forum (KNMF) was held as part of the Malaria Programme Review to bring together experts and stakeholders involved in malaria control, and to address specific needs that were relevant to contributing new knowledge from research and lessons learnt from implementing different malaria control interventions. Previous KNMFs were held to provide an opportunity for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners involved in malaria control to interact and share evidence to inform policy and practice. The third KNMF was held in the backdrop of a Malaria Programme Review, conducted to inform the development of a new Kenya Malaria Strategy (KMS). The meeting was hosted by the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP), Ministry of Health, with support from partners, including the World Health Organization and the President’s Malaria Initiative, among others. Nearly 200 experts participated in the forum, representing national governments, 47 counties, international organizations and nongovernmental organizations, and academic and research institutions.

Overall, the third KNMF provided an opportunity for the steering committee tasked with spearheading the Malaria Programme Review, to learn from the experiences and lessons arising from the implementation of malaria control activities and draw useful insights to inform the development of the next KMS. In addition, it provided an avenue for stakeholders, especially those from research and academia, civil society organizations, and county governments, to contribute ideas and insights into the development of the KMS.

This report outlines the approach used in the planning of the third Kenya National Malaria Forum (KNMF) and the objectives and the outcome of the Forum held on 18–19 September, 2018. The report further provides key highlights from each of the presentations and recommendations to inform the development of the next Kenya Malaria Strategy (KMS).

Assessment of Tanzania’s District-Level HIV Referral Systems: Linking Communities and Facilities

Assessment of Tanzania’s District-Level HIV Referral Systems: Linking Communities and FacilitiesHealth systems are increasingly relying on community-based organizations (CBOs) and community workers to provide care and support services to individuals affected by HIV and AIDS. Community health workers can deliver a range of services to improve clients’ well-being, provide direct care and treatment, and give support throughout the continuum of care. Additionally, community workers often identify clients in need of services and track them to return them to care.

Strong linkages between community and health facility providers help clients obtain the critical services they need in a timely fashion. Referral systems are an important mechanism for creating strong linkages. Referrals facilitate moving clients through the health care system and exchanging health information between providers. A good referral system helps clients gain access to services, encourages clients to seek care and support, and can also help providers track the services that clients receive and then follow up on client health care needs.

In Tanzania, various national HIV guidelines call for strong referral systems between the community and clinical services to ensure patients receive adequate health care at all levels. To assess the status of referral systems, MEASURE Evaluation conducted an assessment from February to April 2016 in three districts in Tanzania: Kinondoni, Kyela, and Waging’ombe.

Access the report.

The MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania Small Grants Program: Building Capacity and Informing HIV/AIDS Programs

The MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania Small Grants Program: Building Capacity and Informing HIV/AIDS ProgramsSmall grants are one mechanism to promote research capacity and provide financial support for health research conducted in low-income countries. When host country teams research issues, develop strategies, and implement solutions, those actions promote sustainability, a goal championed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

MEASURE Evaluation–Tanzania (MEval-TZ), funded by USAID, administered small grants to local universities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in Tanzania to contribute to Result 3 of the project: an increased evidence base for community health and social service programs through conducting research and building research capacity. This brief provides an overview of the small grants program.

Assessing Spatial Data Quality Using Five Data Anomalies: Speeding the Process for Master Facility Lists and Other Large Data Sets

Assessing Spatial Data Quality Using Five Data Anomalies: Speeding the Process for Master Facility Lists and Other Large Data SetsWith the increased ease of the collection of geographic data coordinates and the desire for accurate country master facility lists (MFLs) comes the need for tools and methods with which to rapidly assess the quality of large spatial data sets. Global health professionals who have had limited training in the use of geographic information systems may need guidance in assessing spatial data. Identifying data quality issues in data sets of this size is challenging, because of the complex relationship between the spatial components and the attributes of the data.

Informed by spatial data quality literature, this paper presents a framework for assessing common issues with spatial data and identifies five specific potential data anomalies that can be identified and further investigated to increase the quality of a spatial data set, such as an MFL. Focusing on these five anomalies will provide quantifiable results, which help in planning a practical, effective strategy for corrections. This approach yields not only a list of the locations that need to be corrected, but also feedback on what may be wrong with the data.