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Characterizing Male Sexual Partners of Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Mozambique

Characterizing Male Sexual Partners of Adolescent Girls and Young Women in MozambiqueIn countries with generalized HIV epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa, adolescence marks an increase in HIV prevalence and the emergence, and dramatic expansion, of gender disparities in HIV (Idele, et al., 2014). Recent estimates from seven African countries found that the prevalence of HIV among women ages 15–25 is more than twice that of their male counterparts (Brown, et al., 2018).

Despite the epidemiological and human rights imperative to help adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) remain AIDS-free, programming in this area has had limited success.

One strategy is to prevent the HIV-negative male sexual partners of AGYW from acquiring HIV and to reduce the infectiousness of those male partners who are HIV-positive. This strategy requires information about the characteristics of male sexual partners of AGYW.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Mozambique asked MEASURE Evaluation—which is funded by USAID and the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief—to study the characteristics of men who have recently engaged in sexual activity with AGYW. This work falls in line with MEASURE Evaluation’s efforts to control the HIV epidemic. The resulting study sought answers to the following research questions:

  1. Who are the sexual partners of AGYW?
  2. Is sexual risk-taking behavior among AGYW and their male partners associated with certain sexual partner characteristics?
  3. To what extent are male sexual partners of AGYW using, or willing to use, HIV/AIDS services?

HIV prevention and care programs should use the study’s results to reach male sexual partners of AGYW more effectively.

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Versão em Português: https://www.measureevaluation.org/resources/publications/fs-18-286%20pt/

DHIS 2 Functions and Data Use for Health Information System Strengthening Training Manual

DHIS 2 Functions and Data Use for Health Information System Strengthening Training Manual: Facilitators’ GuideThis manual was developed to augment the capacity and skills of Council Health Management Teams (CHMTs) and Regional Health Management Teams (RHMTs) in Tanzania to use the advanced functions and features of DHIS 2.

The training manual addresses competencies that will enable users to improve the quality, analysis, and use of routinely collected health management information system data for effective health program monitoring, planning, and decision making.

Access the participants’ guide and a facilitators’ guide.

Evaluation of the Partnership for HIV-Free Survival Country Assessment: Mozambique

Evaluation of the Partnership for HIV-Free Survival Country Assessment: MozambiqueThe Partnership for HIV-Free Survival (PHFS) was a six-country initiative implemented between 2012–2016. It was designed to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV and increase child survival. This document focuses on seven components of PHFS in Mozambique highlighted by a legacy evaluation of partnership activities. The findings are based largely on a rapid assessment conducted by MEASURE Evaluation in Mozambique in January 2018. The core components follow:

  • Harmonized quality improvement
  • Patient records
  • Mother-baby pairs
  • Breastfeeding practices
  • Integration of services
  • Community-patient links
  • Coaching

The assessment was conducted by MEASURE Evaluation, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United States President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). This brief presents findings from the evaluation of activities related to PHFS in Mozambique. Findings from assessments of PHFS in other participating countries are available here.

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A Tool to Assess the Impact of Girls’ Clubs and Savings Groups on Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Mozambique

A Tool to Assess the Impact of Girls’ Clubs and Savings Groups on Adolescent Girls and Young Women in MozambiqueThe United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) launched the Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS-free, Mentored, and Safe (DREAMS) initiative in 2016 to accelerate reduction of HIV infections among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) in 10 sub-Saharan African countries.

Girls’ clubs and savings groups for AGYW are core HIV prevention components of the global DREAMS evidence-informed package of recommended interventions. This tool is designed to be used by DREAMS implementing partners to measure individual-level changes that result from participation in girls’ clubs and/or savings groups for AGYW. It is designed to be administered prior to beginning either intervention, and then again following completion of the intended participation period, which will typically be one year.

Access the resource. Also available in Portuguese.

A Retenção de Adolescentes e Mulheres Jovens em Programação de Prevenção ao HIV: Uma revista de clubes des raparigas e grupos de poupança para adolescentes e mulheres jovens

A Retenção de Adolescentes e Mulheres Jovens em Programação de Prevenção ao HIV Uma revista de clubes des raparigas e grupos de poupança para adolescentes e mulheres jovensO Plano de Emergência do Presidente dos Estados Unidos para o Alívio da AIDS (PEPFAR) lançou a iniciativa Determinada, Resiliente, Empoderada, Livre da AIDS, Aconselhada e Segura (Determined, Resilient, Empowered, AIDS-free, Mentored, and Safe, DREAMS) em 2016 para acelerar a redução de infecções por HIV entre adolescentes e mulheres jovens (AMJ) em 10 países na África Subsaariana.

Os clubes de raparigas e os grupos de poupança para as AMJ são componentes essenciais na prevenção do HIV do pacote global de intervenções recomendadas com base em evidências da DREAMS. No âmbito da iniciativa DREAMS em Moçambique, na altura em que esta actividade começou, os clubes e grupos estavam sendo implementados como parte de um pacote maior de serviços DREAMS financiados por dois projetos da Agência dos Estados Unidos para o Desenvolvimento Internacional (USAID): Projeto Força à Comunidade e às Crianças (FCC, Child and Community Strengthening [Fortalecimento à Criança e à Comunidade]) de World Education International (WEI) e do projeto Strengthening Communities through Integrated Programming (Fortalecimento das Comunidades através da Programação Integrada, SCIP) de World Vision (Visão Mundial).

A Retenção de Adolescentes e Mulheres Jovens em Programação de Prevenção ao HIV Uma revista de clubes des raparigas e grupos de poupança para adolescentes e mulheres jovens

Attrition from HIV Care and Treatment Services in Tanzania: Magnitude and Reasons

Attrition from HIV Care and Treatment Services in Tanzania: Magnitude and ReasonsBecause sustained participation is necessary for HIV treatment to be effective, understanding factors that govern participation—or lack of it—is vital to the work of MEASURE Evaluation, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, to improve site-level health services.

This study aimed to determine the magnitude of attrition for people living with HIV (PLHIV) from antiretroviral therapy (ART), determine common types of attrition, and document reasons for poor retention in ART services—all to improve retention of PLHIV in ART. By addressing this knowledge gap, this research contributes to USAID’s goal of controlling the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

This study used retrospective record review and a cross-sectional study design involving PLHIV enrolled in treatment between 2006 and 2014 in two high-volume care and treatment clinics in MnaziMmoja Hospital (Ilala District, Dar es Salaam region) and Mkuranga District Hospital (Pwani Region).

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Data Demand and Use Curriculum – Facilitator’s Guide

Data Demand and Use Curriculum – Facilitator’s GuideSignificant human and financial resources have been invested worldwide in the collection of data to measure public health at various levels, such as within a specific population, facility, or community. However, this information is not always used efficiently to inform policy and programmatic decision making. Health programs and policymakers often fail to link evidence to decisions about how to address public health issues. As a result, they are not able to respond most effectively to priority needs of the populations they serve.

Using data effectively for evidence-based decision making involves the following considerations:

  • How does information flow up to decision makers, and how do they use it to make their decisions?
  • In what contexts are data collected and decisions made?
  • What are the organizational infrastructures and technical capacities of those who generate and use data?

This curriculum and facilitator’s guide was designed to explain the conceptual basis for training on data demand and use (DDU) within an organization or program, or at the national, state, or district levels of government. It provides tools created by MEASURE Evaluation to facilitate the use of data in decision making. The goal is twofold:

  • Improve the understanding of the role of data in decision making, the context of decision making, the determinants of data use, and the importance of data sharing and feedback.
  • Build skills for applying DDU tools.

Ideally, this training course should be delivered to teams from the same organization or government level. Each team should include both data users and data producers. Data users are health professionals, policymakers, and other key health decision makers who use data to inform the design, implementation, monitoring, and improvement of health programs. Data producers are professionals who acquire and analyze health data and prepare them for distribution to users. These professionals may be monitoring and evaluation (M&E) specialists, data clerks, and researchers. This team approach to training ensures that all data producers and professionals involved understand their respective roles in DDU and how their roles interact with each other.

When team training is not feasible, this course may be used in separate trainings for data users and data producers from the same organization. To minimize costs, this type of training can be conducted as an add-on to previously scheduled meetings. In such a case trainers should emphasize the links between data users and data producers.

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