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Reading: Diseases of Poverty

Diseases of Poverty: Epidemiology, Infectious Diseases, and Modern Plagues
Adams, Lisa V. and John R. Butterly

Adams and Butterly examine the epidemiology and social impact of past and present infectious disease epidemics in the developing and developed world. They present early and contemporary perspectives on disease and disease control, examine specific diseases that represent “loud” and “silent emergencies,” and explore topics including: antibiotic resistance, AIDS, malaria, pandemic influenza, and nutrition and sanitation. The work of USAID is discussed in several chapters.

Webinar: Strengthening National M&E Systems for Orphans and Vulnerable Children Programs

Photo by Jessica Fehringer, MEASURE Evaluation

In order for an M&E system to be effective and sustained, the system must be developed based on the information needs of the people who will ultimately use the system. MEASURE Evaluation’s approach to developing M&E systems for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) programs has been highly participatory, engaging key stakeholders from the start to understand their information needs and develop appropriate indicators, and ultimately improving the use of data collected through electronic systems.

In a webinar on August 4, Emeka Anoje from Catholic Relief Services’ SMILE project in Nigeria and Prisca Mgomberi from MEASURE Evaluation’s Tanzanian Associate Award will present on the process to strengthen national OVC M&E systems in Nigeria and Tanzania in a way that promotes use and sustainability. Their presentations will describe processes to conduct user needs and system assessments, develop indicators with stakeholder input, harmonize indicators across sectors, establish consensus on data flow, and ultimately develop an electronic system that fits the country’s capacity.

Learn more and register to attend the webinar.

Webinar: Strengthening National M&E Systems for Orphans and Vulnerable Children Program

In order for an M&E system to be effective and sustained, the system must be developed based on the information needs of the people who will ultimately use the system. MEASURE Evaluation’s approach to developing M&E systems for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) programs has been highly participatory, engaging key stakeholders from the start to understand their information needs and develop appropriate indicators, and ultimately improving the use of data collected through electronic systems.

In a webinar on August 4 at 9:00am EDT, Emeka Anoje from Catholic Relief Services’ SMILE project in Nigeria and Prisca Mgomberi from MEASURE Evaluation’s Tanzanian Associate Award will present on the process to strengthen national OVC M&E systems in Nigeria and Tanzania in a way that promotes use and sustainability. Their presentations will describe processes to conduct user needs and system assessments, develop indicators with stakeholder input, harmonize indicators across sectors, establish consensus on data flow, and ultimately develop an electronic system that fits the country’s capacity.

Learn more and register to attend the webinar.

Seeing the World as a Network – Sam Wambugu

Sam Wambugu - Recent photo visiting a traditional homestead in SwazilandIn Phase IV we have seen a major turn toward ICT (information and communication technology). To show you how we have equipped ourselves to respond to the new needs and opportunities, I am going to highlight some of our ICT staff over the next couple of months. We’ll start with Sam Wambugu.

Sam is Kenyan, born in the Central region, near Mount Kenya. Although he is MEASURE Evaluation’s Senior Technical Specialist for Informatics, [in·for·mat·ics; infərˈmadiks; noun: the science of processing data for storage and retrieval; information science], he didn’t start that way. Initially, his father had in mind that Sam would be a farmer. But Sam’s mind was on journalism rather than the farm. He realized his dream after college when he was hired by the largest paper in East Africa to write a column on – and here is the connection – ICT and how it affects our daily lives. In the last 10 years he has written over 500 stories, averaging an article per week. Sam now describes his passions as playing with numbers and seeing how technology can provide solutions to day to day problems.

Sam first worked with MEASURE Evaluation via ICF from 2007 to 2010 as the Resident Advisor in Kenya for Strategic Information for PEPFAR. In that role, he supported over 100 PEPFAR implementing partners in Kenya to collect, clean, collate and report their data to PEPFAR semi-annually. This time around with MEASURE Evaluation (still with ICF), Sam is based in Chapel Hill, and he is focusing on all ICT aspects of routine health information systems, including data collection, analysis, and use. Sam, we are glad to have you with us.

Jim

Reading: World Development Indicators 2015

World Development Indicators 2015
World Bank. Washington, DC: World Bank, 2015. 

This volume provides a compilation of internationally comparable statistics about global development and the fight against poverty, while reviewing global progress toward the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Key indicators are organized around six themes including: world view, people, environment, economy, states and markets, and global links.

Seeing the World as a Network – Alimou Barry

Alimou at  CESAGIn May, a number of MEASURE Evaluation staff attended a meeting in Accra, Ghana, on the West African health information strengthening (HIS) needs revealed by the Ebola epidemic. One of the rock stars at that meeting was our own Alimou Barry, who is with JSI and MEASURE Evaluation. Alimou has conducted several HIS assessments and recently evaluated the impact of resources being diverted to Ebola activities on non-Ebola health outcomes in Guinea. Alimou is Guinean, he is the project country technical focal person for Cote d’Ivoire and the activity lead for the CESAG regional training center in Senegal, and he is supervising work in Mali. With his activity throughout West Africa, Alimou seemed to know everyone in the room at the Accra meeting.

Before coming to MEASURE Evaluation, Alimou went to school on three continents (Africa, Europe, and North America); he was a professor of pharmaceutical chemistry in Daka; a deputy coordinator of an STD and HIV prevention project in Guinea; a public health specialist at the USAID Mission in Guinea; and a CDC Senior Technical Advisor for HIV in Mali.

Alimou is also a movie star. He played roles in two documentary films: one at age 10 (“Mory le Crab”), and another on prevention of cancers and STDs among women (in 1995). Around the time of the cancer documentary, Alimou also founded an NGO on the same topic. Alimou also used to be a soccer player and he loves politics. Remember how I said he seemed to know everyone? Well, he knows several Guinean politicians well enough to advise them on ideas for a better Guinea.

Jim

World Population Day: A market approach to meet contraceptive need

Photo by Jack Hazerjian, MEASURE Evaluation.

Photo by Jack Hazerjian, MEASURE Evaluation.

On World Population Day (July 11, 2015) MEASURE Evaluation draws attention to its ongoing collaboration with the EVIDENCE project to work on what is called the “total market approach” (TMA) to providing family planning. This approach seeks to gather and use data to strengthen collaboration between the three market sectors (public, nonprofit, and commercial) providing family planning products and services in order to more efficiently segment the market, says Dominique Meekers, PhD, professor of global community health and behavioral sciences at Tulane University in New Orleans – a partner organization with MEASURE Evaluation. “Having an efficiently segmented market will help grow the total market, which will benefit all three sectors,” he says.

Learn more about the “total market approach” to providing family planning.

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